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Reasons not to miss Wimbledon 2015

Reasons not to miss Wimbledon 2015.

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French Open wrap – things I learned from Roland Garros

French Open wrap – things I learned from Roland Garros.

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French Open wrap – things I learned from Roland Garros

Third  time unlucky - the career Grand Slam still eludes Djokovic

Third time unlucky – the career Grand Slam still eludes Djokovic

The Golden Oldies show no sign of slowing down

Not the usual suspects that get spoken of all the time, but the veterans that rarely get a mention. Two former Roland Garros champs put on one of the matches of the tournament; Francesca Schiavone’s defeat of Svetlana Kuznetsova in the second round had the fans out of their seats on so many occasions. Errors were scarce as each point turned into a mini-classic. Eventually it was the 2010 champion who overcame her 2009 counterpart, just as she had done in the 2011 Australian Open in their 4hour 45 minutes record-breaking encounter. It’s worth noting that this was Schiavone’s 59th consecutive Grand Slam, an absolutely incredible achievement which is great testament to the way the Italian, who turns 35 in a fortnight, has looked after her body over the years. In addition, the titles were won by champions who are both in their fourth decade. On top of all of this, you have the likes of Ana Ivanovic, Lucie Safarova and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga who are playing as well as, if not better, than at any other time in their careers.

Schiavone and Kuznetsova always produce instant classics

Schiavone and Kuznetsova always produce instant classics

There is no Big 3 or Big 4

The golden age of Nadal, Djokovic and Federer all at their peaks is history. Will Federer win another major? Possibly, though you would say that his best chance will come within the next five weeks. Will Nadal will another French Open? Probably. Will Novak Djokovic win more majors? Certainly. But the days of only this triumvirate sharing out the majors are gone for good. Djokovic is deservedly the best in the world right now, his consistency is second to none and if there’s any justice he will win that elusive French Open title – more on that to follow. Andy Murray believes he is back to playing his best tennis and ready to win more majors. His improved clay court performance points to brighter things beyond the 2015 Parisian horizon; he is well-placed to mount serious challenges for that title in the next couple of years and will be one of the two favourites going into the London summer later this month. As much as Djokovic is the most consistent and consistently best player in the world right now, Stanislas Wawrinka’s best tennis is better than anybody else’s best tennis. The way his backhand stood up to scrutiny and pressure during the final on Sunday was immense. His big shot won him a second Grand Slam, and you cannot rule out further titles for the Swiss. Much like Petra Kvitova on the women’s side, when Stan is hot nobody can touch him.

The future’s looking bright too

I believe that tennis is in rude health at this moment in time. The changing of the guard is not so much a dramatic process in the men’s game, rather an evolutionary one. And whilst Serena Williams remains the dominant force on the women’s side, there is plenty of healthy competition underneath her.  As well as the aforementioned ‘veterans’, of which runner-up Lucie Safarova deserves special mention for her magnificent run this past fortnight and her refusal to go away in the final, the new guard are all jockeying for position. You would have got big money if you had predicted that Sloane Stephens, Andrea Mitu, Elina Svitlolina and Alison van Uytvanck would all reach the Last 16 in Paris, but that they did. Stephens had eventual champion Serena on the ropes at 6-1 5-5 before slipping to a three-set defeat and Svitolina hinted at great sporadic things in her future by reaching the quarter-finals. Van Uytvanck is the wild card here; her flat-hitting may see her become a part of the establishment for years to come if she can hit so hard and consistently over the coming years. Of course it’s always a big if when a new name comes through but she definitely has the power to play a big part. On the men’s side, the likes of Jack Sock and Borna Coric are starting to win matches at Grand Slam level, which will hopefully be the next step in their transition into big deals. Sock in particular has done ever so well to overcome years of niggling injuries and it was great to see his name still in the draw as the event entered its second week. With Milos Raonic missing through injury but starting to regularly reach quarters and Kei Nishikori getting closer on a more-regular basis, the men’s game has enough depth to suggest competitive Slams lie ahead of us. The next few years promises to showcase some classic struggles as the likes of Nadal, Federer and eventually Djokovic go out fighting against the best of the rest.

Belgium's next big thing? Van Uytvanck can be proud of her ten days' work

Belgium’s next big thing? Van Uytvanck can be proud of her ten days’ work

Obsession is dangerous

Novak Djokovic must have thought his French Open time had come when he swatted aside the challenge of nine-time champion Rafael Nadal in the quarter-finals and the ovation he received after losing his third final will live with him for a long time. It went on and on and on and the Serb did well to hold off his tears – so after all this time, like so often with tennis, the way you get people to like you more is by losing. Tennis fans love the guys who are chasing their own personal holy grail; Borg with Roland Garros and Goran Ivanisevic and Jana Novotna in their pursuit of a Wimbledon crown are the three that spring straight to mind. Unfortunately for Djokovic, you sense that he himself feels his career will be defined by his Roland Garros pursuit now; win it, complete the career Grand Slam and forever be immortalised but fail to do so and forever be remembered as the guy that chased the dream which was always just out of his grasp. As good as Wawrinka was in the final, you did get an overriding sense that the undisputed best player in the world felt the weight of history that was on his shoulders was just too much. I really hope for his sake that he can channel his excitement and eagerness to make history in the coming years or the career Grand Slam he deserves will pass him by.

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Bad for tennis – the tarnished legacy of Serena Williams

Bad for tennis – the tarnished legacy of Serena Williams.

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Bad for tennis – the tarnished legacy of Serena Williams

I’m going to start this piece by reminding people that I have been the biggest fan of the World Number 1 for well over a decade now. I’ve slowly, surely, and now suddenly come to the realisation that I can’t avoid the fact that what comes with her is bad for tennis and it has nothing to do with her dominance of the game. It’s the ongoing illnesses, the lack of grace when winning, the disgraceful background that sits behind some of her biggest losses and her general on-court demeanour. Forget the Williams Sisters story and where they came from (that will always be a model to follow) but look instead to how she behaves now at the pinnacle of the sport and ask yourself the question – would you want a child of yours to behave like that when in a position to inspire new generations? Some of you will answer yes, and point to the fact that winners are made of different stuff. But I say right here that in my opinion Serena Williams is a stain on the current game and her legacy will be forever stained.

It’s often said that we hold sport stars to different moral codes to the rest of the population. There are arguments to either side of that but I’m going to suppose here that we do and look at the incidents away from Serena’s incredible haul of Grand Slam and Olympic titles. There are very few champions that go through a whole career without putting a foot wrong or occasionally erring on the wrong side of a moral code but then there others where it becomes more of a pattern. For me, Steffi Graf will always have an asterisk against her Grand Slam total for the point in her 1999 French Open Final in which she pointed the incorrect mark on the clay court to the umpire. This was not a wily old champ showing gamesmanship; this was a desperate act of cheating to hold off the new guard. Couple this with Graf’s desire to remove Monica Seles’ protected ranking when the American was recovering from BEING STABBED ON COURT and this is why I don’t hold Graf in fond memory, despite how we have all been seduced with her ‘love match’ with Andre Agassi.  I love tennis and I don’t like anything that goes with it which makes me dislike the sport.

And this is the thing that is now impossible to ignore with Serena Williams – there are just way too many things that she does that makes the experience of watching the sport I love a thoroughly unpleasant one. Let’s go through the big ones first, the ones we all know about; namely the 2009 and 2011 US Opens. In the 2009 US Open, Serena Williams was correctly given a code violation and lost a point on match point after threatening to shove a tennis ball down the throat of a line judge who had correctly called a foot fault on Williams’ serve. Our distinguished World Number One denied this and then refused to apologise until audio evidence was produced to confirm that she had indeed made that threat. So not only did she bully a line judge, but she also lied. The fact that the Grand Slam Committee chose to issue the biggest possible fine instead of suspending her from Slams serves only to show that top players are treated differently, which is not the main idea behind this piece. Fast forward two years to her appearance in the final of the 2011 US Open. The chair umpire correctly called a hindrance when Williams shouted ‘come on!’ after hitting a shot which her opponent Samantha Stosur still had a chance of reaching. Again, Williams showed the lack of class and grace (look away from the twirls and the kiss-blowing, for goodness sake) that has blighted her career by launching into a tirade on the chair umpire, including telling her that she was ‘ugly inside’ and should ‘look the other way if you see me coming’. She later went on to passive-aggressively claim in the trophy presentation that she “hit a winner but I guess it didn’t count”. Her refusal to accept when she breaks the rules does not do her any favours.

Threatening to hurt a line judge

Threatening to hurt a line judge

And then there are the ‘minor’ quibbles. The disgraceful use of ‘Fuck’ in all its variations throughout the second set in yesterday’s final is something we don’t want to see from a professional athlete. I note Andy Murray takes criticism like this and apologies for it and realises that it’s a bad example to set to watching kids. However, to date Serena hasn’t bothered to apologise for the example that her foul-mouthed audible conversation with herself yesterday sets to the generation of future players she often talks about inspiring.

For a professional athlete, she does tend to get ill a hell of a lot. I would suggest she looks into her training and fitness regime because for somebody at the very top of her game to come into two successive Slams grumbling about her body’s ails is at best suspicious and at worst for her, extremely worrying. The tennis Twitterati went into meltdown when British Number 9 Tara Moore claimed that Serena is one of the best actresses to ever play the game. I mention the fact that Moore is the British Number 9 because the people who ridiculed her seemed to think that because Moore is ranked lowly in the tennis world she is somehow not allowed an opinion (despite her being a better tennis player than all those disagreeing with her and claiming she was unqualified to comment due to her ranking). Nobody is questioning Williams’ ability; her serve is the best that the women’s game will likely ever see and her groundstrokes and power play have taken the game to a level unthinkable even ten years ago.

What I am questioning is how many times has Serena Williams genuinely given praise to an opponent who has beaten her without somewhere along the line hinting that she was in some way ill, whether that be pre-match, post-match or worse of all during the match? 2004 was the first sign of this when she suffered an abdominal injury mid-match to Maria Sharapova in the finals of the End of Season Championships. She limped around like a sulking child and gave Sharapova minimal praise, either in verbal form or body language. One could argue that as a fighting champion she doesn’t believe in retiring mid-match but a series of retirements and withdrawals in the few years that followed, including in the semi-final of the same event two years later, put paid to that line of defence. She also missed three months due to dental surgery; something which I guess would have less effects than stomach cramping and acute muscle spasms. The assumption can be made that Serena knows the age-old adage that an injured player is difficult to play against and sticks out there to get in her opponents’ heads when she is injured – if she is injured, of course. The Australian Open of 2007 is perhaps her biggest triumph when she came into it overweight and written off but claimed the title for the loss of just three games in a final with Sharapova. But again, the footnote reads: struggled on-court with a cold during the first six rounds. Yes, a 12 day cold for a professional athlete. No further comment.

One of many on-court collapses, this time during Wimbledon 2007

One of many on-court collapses, this time during Wimbledon 2007

Fast forward five months to her Wimbledon third round match with Daniela Hantuchova when at a set down and 5-5 in the second set, Williams collapsed on court, later citing an acute muscle spasm. She could barely walk for the next three games but managed to force a third set. It was horrendous to watch and little knows what it was like for both players to experience. The fact that she managed to come through this has more to do with the fact that her opponent was left stunned, like she was having to put a dying animal out of its misery and couldn’t stick the injection in. Serena refused to withdraw and limped around in the following match where the more-ruthless Justine Henin didn’t have the problems that Hantuchova had. If you’re so unfit that you can’t walk, surely as a professional athlete you make a decision thinking about long-term consequences? These are the stand-out injury performances over the years, most Slams are littered with at least one match in which Serena visibly struggles with her fitness. There is this underlying current in which Serena almost forces an opinion on the watching audience that no opponent on tour is capable of beating her unless she is seen to be struggling with an illness. It’s happened numerous times in non-Slam events and happened in Paris against Sloane Stephens and Timea Bacsinszky; it does appear to happen more regularly against players who are not used to playing on the stage on which they are playing ie Bacsinszky’s first semi-final appearance. Again, no further comment.

Finally, I take you back to one of the things that tarnished Graf’s legacy in my eyes. In the third round of this year’s French Open, the line umpire called for a point to be replayed after an incorrect call had been made. It was at a vital stage of the match; Azarenka leading a set and 5-6. The point should not have been replayed as Serena knew it was a clear winner from Azarenka. So this 20-time Grand Slam champion that is often hailed as a fair and sporting champion chose to carry on without pointing that out. She is quick at other times to overrule the umpire for her opponents, but not at crucial points against women she knows are capable of bettering her. A chance to be truly virtuous missed.

The illnesses are increasing in frequency - problem with the training regime or something more sinister?

The illnesses are increasing in frequency – problem with the training regime or something more sinister?

Only Serena Williams herself knows how often she is ill, and what leads to all of these badly-times illnesses. Only Serena Williams herself knows why she chooses to inspire a generation with fighting ability but doesn’t care if she drops the F bomb numerous times and doesn’t have a problem in doing so. Only Serena Williams herself knows why she so rarely gives credit to opponents without it being qualified with her own health issues. Only Serena Williams herself knows what lies behind the anger that spills over towards officials when they make correct decisions which go against her. Only Serena Williams herself knows how much of her on-court antics and lack of sportsmanship are genuine, gamesmanship or simply cheating. Her book when she retires could be a gruesome insight into all of this, except here’s the thing – I wouldn’t believe a word she said in it. And that will always be Serena Williams’ legacy: the greatest of all time? Possibly, maybe even probably. Unbelievable? Yes, on so many different levels.

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The King is on the ropes – could it happen? French Open preview

The King is on the ropes – could it happen? French Open preview.

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Agnes Water, 1770, Airlie Beach, The Whitsundays and Townsville

Agnes Water, 1770, Airlie Beach, The Whitsundays and Townsville.

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