Tag Archives: Elena Vesnina

Wimbledon 2016 – how they rated

Andy Murray 9/10

Two-time Wimbledon champion

 

The Brit exceeded pre-tournament expectations but, more importantly, dealt with the burden of becoming favourite over the final nine days of the tournament. His run to the title was stress-free save for a tough two sets against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the quarter-finals. Crucially, the Scot kept his head when so often in the Lendl-free days he would have lost it. A first major for three years is a great way of starting his partnership with Jamie Delgado, with Lendl back in the mix too. Expect Murray to go close in New York after helping Great Britain into the semis of the Davis Cup but don’t rule out an early exit in Rio where he will defend his Olympic crown.

Milos Raonic 8/10

Make no mistake – Carlos Moya is taking this guy to a new level. There’s been a lot of credit given to the latest ‘super coach’ John McEnroe yet it is Moya who is adding steel to Raonic’s game. The Canadian’s rise has been solid and he now finally looks capable of being a Slam winner. He should and will be disappointed with his inability to figure out Murray’s brick wall in the final but he will get another shot in the US Open and his game suits three of the four majors so expect him to win one sooner rather than later. He found a way to get past the legend that is Roger Federer in the match of the tournament and will now feel he belongs in every conversation about possible winners at the next two Slams.

Roger Federer 6/10

This may seem harsh but Federer missed his last chance here. His comeback win over Marin Cilic was dramatic but the chinks in his game were spotted and exploited by Raonic. Federer schooled the Canadian at Wimbledon 2014 but whilst the younger man has moved on, Federer’s body has finally refused him any further progress. It remains to be seen if the Swiss will take part in the 2017 season. Will he still be a major semi-finalist should he decide to go on? Probably. Can he win another? The answer to that is a categorical no. Federer’s joie de jouer may now dip if he feels he cannot make it to Grand Slam #18. One thing’s for sure – a more popular player Centre Court will not see for many a decade.

Federer victorious in 2011

17 and most probably out…

 

Novak Djokovic 6/10

Not as disastrous as it first seems. This guy has been putting his body and mind under insane pressure in his quest for the Calendar Slam. His early exit here coupled with his usual sitting-out of the Davis Cup quarter-finals will give the world #1 the necessary time to recuperate from what has been a stunning year in which he held all four majors. The pressure will have been notched down rather than up for a change so don’t be surprised to see Djokovic return fitter, stronger and just as good as before.

Nicolas Mahut 10/10

The genial Frenchman has ensured that his name will not just be remembered for THAT 2011 match which he lost. As well as reaching the last 16 in the singles, the 34-year-old has found a young doubles partner capable of complementing his game perfectly. They are now holders of two of the four majors and are the best doubles team in the world right now; Pierre-Hugues Herbert can achieve things in singles also but I’m sure most neutrals were more delighted for his partner Mahut as he became a Wimbledon champion on Saturday evening.

Nick Kyrgios 2/10

Everybody knows I’m not a fan so I won’t write too much. Get a grip, Kyrgios. People are paying big money and to tank when you lose a set is pathetic. Hire a coach who will test you, not pander to you. Want to be a champion or not? Talented players without the desire to win are ten-a-penny and are forgotten overnight. Kyrgios has the ability to win Wimbledon but right now he is a million miles away as he has the heart of a pea.

Serena Williams 10/10

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22 not out

 

If Kyrgios wants an example of how it is done, he should look no further than the seven-time Wimbledon champion who now has 22 Grand Slams to her name. At the age of 30, she took the decision to hire Patrick Mouratoglu as her coach and their partnership has reaped gigantic reward. Serena has never lost a mental battle on court and her Wimbledon fortnight is one to be cherished. She was pushed in round 2 by her compatriot Christina McHale but came through in three sets. From there, her route was relatively straightforward but when pushed by Angelique Kerber in the final, she came out on top. This will be of huge relief to the American after losses at the business end of the previous three majors. If I had a mansion, I would put it at stake to back Serena to win #23 in nine weeks’ time.

Angelique Kerber 8/10

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Kerber v2.0 can win more majors

 

The Australian Open champion made serene progress during the first week before knocking out Simona Halep and Venus Williams in consecutive rounds. She could not repeat her feat of defeating Serena but her overall fortnight has lain to rest any lingering remnants of the old mentally-fragile Kerber. Angie v2.0 is a force to be reckoned with. It would be a major surprise if she fails to surpass her previous best of a quarter-final berth in New York in September and she is likely to once again provide the younger Williams with her stiffest competition. Let’s hope the Wimbledon champion’s longevity encourages Kerber that she too can maintain this level for a good few years.

Venus Williams 9/10

There was nothing spectacular about the elder Williams’ run to the semi-finals, defeating nobody that she hadn’t been expected to. However therein lays the sheer quality of her tournament and level; at the age of 36 she is still living with players in the Top 10. She is still capable of winning slams – yes it requires a favourable draw and a Serena slip but Venus is as capable now of winning the US Open or Wimbledon as at any other time in the last five years.

Elena Vesnina 9/10

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Vesnina’s stand-out single performance

 

‘The Vesh’ finally gets a mention on this page for her singles exploits. A multi-slam doubles champion, she went deep into a major for the first time on her own. Knocking out Andrea Petkovic, Ekaterina Makarova and Dominika Cibulkova meant that she deserved her place in the last four. Granted her semi-final appearance was over quicker than it takes to fly from Paris to London but for somebody who has seen her suffer so many tough first-round losses over the past ten years, it is amazing to see somebody like Vesnina get her moment in the spotlight.

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Blushing bride

 

Dominika Cibulkova 10/10 – Wimbledon quarter-finalist and made it out of there in time to get married. Ace fortnight!

Petra Kvitova 2/10 – Must do better, especially on grass.

Garbine Muguruza 5/10 – Early loss will do her good and keep her feet on the ground.

Simona Halep 7/10 – Back to her best, will go deep in the US Open.

Tomas Berdych 6/10 – Perennial semi-finalist.

Sam Querrey 8/10 – Backed up shock win by making the last eight.

Lucas Pouille 9/10 – Making great strides. Not seen him play yet, but surely one to watch?

Marcus Willis 10/10 – Tested Hollywood scriptwriters. We will NEVER see him again but nice story.

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My Wimbledon 2013 : ground pass goodness and a bit of constructive criticism


The one thing that instantly struck me about Rafael Nadal’s first round defeat on Monday afternoon wasn’t worry for his old knee problem, nor was it to marvel at Steve Darcis’ accomplishment (after all, it’s becoming old hat to send Rafa tumbling early at SW19 – he may be needing a wildcard shortly with all those ‘deserving’ Brits). No, it was to reassert just how wonderful Roger Federer’s achievement is to have reached 36 (not out…..) consecutive major quarter-finals. Not since the 2004 French Open has he failed to be a part of the Last 8. It is a staggering achievement, and does disservice to how difficult it is to reach the latter stages of a Slam. Witness Rafa’s early exit here or Lleyton Hewitt’s first round defeat as defending champion in 2003. Players raise their level against you and every top player can have an off-day. Except Federer, it would seem. Or so it seemed until late on Wednesday evening when his run finally came to an end. He didn’t play his worst match, but Sergiy Stakhovsky produced a master class of serve and volley, a real return to the past. But whatever, Federer’s record of 36 consecutive Grand Slam quarter-finals will never be matched.

My trip to Wimbledon this year consisted of ground pass tickets on Days 1 and 2. Ground pass is really where the value is on the first few days of a Slam, the potential for well-matched ties all over the grounds. Maybe the quality isn’t so high but you usually see competitive action. But this year, I got lucky and managed to see several really high-quality first round match-ups.

2012 girls’ champion Eugenie Bouchard showed no lack of mental fortitude to battle back against the wily Galina Voskoboeva. Bouchard has the game to be a contender in years to come if she can transfer the potential into development. I was delighted to see her follow that up with a smashing win against former French Open champion Ana Ivanovic, although it has to be said that Ana has never been totally at ease on grass. Fernando Verdasco showed a surprising willingness to come to net and out-volley grass-court specialist Xavier Malisse in four highly enjoyable sets. Truth be told, the one I was most looking forward to disappointed. American Sloane Stephens never looked in any danger against her compatriot Jamie Hampton, and whilst the latter has nice variety to her game, for me it is evident that the Australian Open semi-finalist will go further with her career.

Day Two saw Alexandra Cadantu raise her level to comfortably see off a low-on-confidence-and-form Tamira Paszek, a member of the Wimbledon Last Eight Club. The Austrian needs to take some time to pick apart her game – she has talent, but is slipping away at this stage in her career. The biggest height mismatch came out on Court 10, with 5ft6 Olivier Rochus attempting to slay the 6ft9 Kevin Anderson. I’ve only ever seen the Belgian play three times and each time the opponent has been at least 6ft8. It felt a bit like we were at the circus. The veteran hit more drop-shots in a single match than will probably be produced in total during the remainder of the tournament, but as effective as this tactic was it was ultimately in vain as Anderson’s big serving saw him through in the end. Elena Vesnina negotiated a tricky-looking pairing with big-hitter Andrea Hlavackova, following up her first grass-court title in Eastbourne last week by winning through in two impressive sets. The Russian is a favourite of mine, and in particular my tennis mate who insists we watch her every time we go to Slams. After six long years, the player that he always knew was hidden behind all the errors appears to have finally broken out into a Top 20 player. It’s nice when that happens. The best match of my Wimbledon experience was Dominika Cibulkova against Maria-Elena Camerin. Allow me to explain: Camerin is another of these players you just kind of stumble upon. I think we’ve seen her play five times at Wimbledon, and each time she has been defeated. But this was the closest she has come and against a very good player too. Baseline rallies, crosscourt backhand winners, volleys, lobs, drop-shots; this had it all. What we expected to be a 45 minute destruction job turned into two and a half hours of fab grass-court tennis. Well done to both ladies. And see you next year, Camerin!

A word of warning for the best tournament in the world. If you continue to pride yourself on selling 7,500 tickets each day, you must ensure that they can be sold prior to the start of play. It is not fair that a paying customer who is within the first 7,500 people through the gates misses the first 90 minutes of play. I have been going for the past decade and the whole process is getting slower each year. They have moved the start of play forward, but there is no movement in the start of ticket sales. Two hours to sell 7,500 tickets is a tall order. They have to rethink because the popularity is proving too much for them to handle. I would hasten to add that this four-hour process is not helped by the draconian security search that takes fully ten minutes from the moment you remove your belt. In my two days there, the line was held up as officials scurried to seek the answer to whether it was necessary to take belts off and whether knives and forks were allowed (how difficult is it to know the rules in advance). An airport-style security scan is then performed, and then EVERY bag is searched individually by hand. Yeah, 7,500 bags. After scanning. Too much. I don’t think anybody would accuse the US of being lax with security yet the Open is seamless in getting people through quickly and efficiently. The All England Club will probably argue that security is paramount, yet the scanning is not done with people who enter with debenture tickets etc. Maybe people with more money couldn’t possibly be terrorists, what say you Wimbledon? Either way, it’s shoddy and people who join a queue four hours prior to play (the time the Club recommends) deserve to be accommodated on time. Look out for the players and the corporate customers by all means, but don’t forget the real fans.

Due to that factor, despite the enjoyable matches this time Wimbledon only scores 8/10.

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